News & Events

Student Profile: Amy van Lindt

University of Canterbury student Amy van Lindt has been researching the potential role freshwater crayfish could play in stream restoration.

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September newsletter – National Science Challenge

New research on pest control, updates from Better Border Biosecurity, our cross-challenge wānanga and more . . . 

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In response to invasive aquatic weeds, should freshwater mussels go with the flow?

PhD student Tom Moore discusses his research on the impacts of invasive aquatic weeds on kākahi (freshwater mussels).

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If you build it, will they come?

University of Canterbury PhD student Issie Barrett writes about ecological tipping points, and why some restoration projects don’t always go as planned.

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The freshwater mussel housing crisis: eviction by invasive weeds?

University of Waikato PhD candidate Tom Moore investigates the housing crisis of taonga species kākahi.

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Early career leads pay off

Early career researchers are normally associated with uncertainty: short-term contracts, a need for experience, but few opportunities to get any.

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A Paracrangonyx species. Image thanks to Graham Fenwick, NIWA

Endemic groundwater species stay close to home

Many of New Zealand’s groundwater species are “short-range endemics” – being unique species restricted to areas as small as a single catchment.

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Cutting-edge technology to help mahinga kai species

A complete ‘platinum-standard’ reference genome could help the conservation, commercial and customary harvest of a treasured mahinga kai species.

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How many are too many snails?

Snails could stop freshwater invertebrate populations from recovering, even after the stream habitat has been restored.

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Habitat-forming organisms key to ecological ‘tipping points’

Habitat-forming organisms are key to the function or prevention of ecological ‘tipping points’, experts say.

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