Mātauranga Māori For Biological Heritage

Kaumātua- (elder)-led research that puts Māori methods and mātauranga (knowledge) first is a key part of restoring Aotearoa New Zealand’s land and freshwater ecosystems.

The inventory of research outputs and resources can be found here:

Mātauranga Māori For Biological Heritage

 

This research is Completed

Whakamanahia ngā mātauranga o nehe hai oranga tangata, oranga taiao

Kaumātua- (elder) led research that puts Māori methods and mātauranga (knowledge) first is a key part of restoring Aotearoa New Zealand’s land and freshwater ecosystems.

This is the fundamental concept behind this project, facilitated by Cawthron Istitute’s Dr James Ataria and BioHeritage Kaihautū Ngātahi Māori Melanie Mark-Shadbolt.

The team is co-designing their research with kaumātua (Maōri knowledge-holders) and end-users.

“We want the application of this approach to, firstly, restore and future-proof the pre-colonial transfer of mātauranga Māori. Secondly, to contribute to achieving BioHeritage’s mission of reversing the decline of Aotearoa’s biological heritage,” James says.

Overview Te Tirohanga Whānui

  • Restore and futureproof the pre-colonial transfer of mātauranga Māori
  • Contribute to the BioHeritage Challenge mission: to reverse the decline of New Zealand’s biological heritage

Highlights Ngā Mahi Whakahirahira

The real impact of this project has been the empowerment of biodiversity knowledge-holders to lead and guide research.

Giving them space and place to kōrero (talk) about the issues they are facing in maintaining and transferring their mātauranga has been invaluable and feedback has been overwhelmingly positive.

In fact we have found our knowledge holders to be extremely open because the process has been tika (right).

Looking for more information?

If you’re looking for any outputs (papers, data etc) from this project that you don’t see on this page please visit our data repository.

Team Members Ngā kaimahi

  • James Ataria – Rongomaiwahine, Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Tūwharetoa; Cawthron Institute
  • Melanie Mark-Shadbolt – Ngāti Kahungunu, Ngāti Porou, Te Arawa, Te Āti Awa, Ngāti Raukawa, Ngāti Tūwharetoa
  • Simon Lambert – Tūhoe, Ngāti Ruapani ki Waikaremoana; University of Saskatchewan

Resource outputs from this programme

Publication

Empowering the Indigenous voice in a graphical representation of Aotearoa’s biocultural heritage (flora and fauna)

Aotearoa’s (New Zealand’s) biological heritage is in decline due to threats such as climate change and habitat destruction. Aotearoa’s biological heritage and the wider environment…
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Publication

Reimagining governance for ‘Yellowstone’ modelled national parks in the new era of indigenous legal recognition

National parks provide an ideal locale for considering Indigenous customary rights and interests in modern landscapes. This is particularly true for national parks modelled on…
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Publication

Indigenous Rights in Modern Landscapes

This book examines the diverse use of Indigenous customary rights in modern landscapes from a multidisciplinary perspective. Divided into two parts, the first deals explicitly…
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Publication

Values and human interrelationships with nature

People in Nature (PiN) aims to improve our understanding of the interrelationships between people and nature, focussing on the material use of nature by people…
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Publication

Effective Biodiversity Conservation Requires Dynamic, Pluralistic, Partnership-Based Approaches

Biodiversity loss undermines the long-term maintenance of ecosystem functions and the well-being of human populations. Global-scale policy initiatives, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, have…
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Publication

Tuākana/Teina Water Warriors Project: A collaborative learning model integrating mātauranga Māori and science

The Water Warriors is a collaborative project between Te Pā o Rākaihautū and Hagley Community College that was established to look after the waterways and…
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Publication

Whakamanahia Te mātauranga o te Māori: empowering Māori knowledge to support Aotearoa’s aquatic biological heritage

By providing an appropriately historical context, this article is able to consider the critical issues now facing mātauranga and the Māori knowledge holders today, and…
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Publication

Mātauranga Māori: shaping marine and freshwater futures

This special issue brings together rich and diverse experiences and opinions on how mātauranga Māori is informing current, and can inform future, research and decision-making…
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